Travel Alerts & Warnings

Your homeland government maintains a listing of travel and safety alerts with information and advice on developing situations that may affect the safety and well-being of travelers and vacationers. We use RSS feeds to attempt to maintain regularly updated information on the security, entry and exit requirements, health conditions, local laws and culture, natural disasters and climate, and how to find help when you are in a specific nation.

No matter where in the world you intend to travel, make sure you check your destination country’s travel advice and advisories page twice: once when you are planning your trip, and again shortly before you leave. If the region or the country you will be visiting becomes subject to a travel advisory, your travel health insurance or your trip cancellation insurance may be affected. You are solely responsible for your travel decisions.

▣ The following travel alerts and warnings have been issued to alert travelers of potential risks in certain countries and regions.

  • Wed, 23 Oct 2019 23:22:09 +0000: Chile - Travel Advice Summary

    Summary - Closure of border crossings from Chile into Argentina, Bolivia and Peru overnight. Check closure times with local authorities prior to travel

  • Wed, 23 Oct 2019 19:35:10 +0000: Bolivia - Travel Advice Summary

    Latest update: Summary and Safety and security section (Political situation) - factual update on political demonstrations following presidential elections on 20 October 2019

  • Wed, 23 Oct 2019 16:14:49 +0000: Spain - Travel Advice Summary

    Summary - addition of information on severe rain and thunderstorms and updated factual information on protests in Catalonia

  • Wed, 23 Oct 2019 15:04:35 +0000: Argentina - Travel Advice Summary

    Summary - updated information on the land border between Mendoza and Argentina

  • Wed, 23 Oct 2019 13:40:21 +0000: France - Travel Advice Summary

    Summary - addition of information on severe rain and thunderstorms with the potential for flash flooding for parts of south-western France, forecast for the next 2-3 days

Airport Safety

▣ The following travel alerts and warnings have been issued to alert travelers of potential risks in certain countries and regions.

  • Wed, 23 Oct 2019 00:00:00 +0000: Bolivia - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution - travel.state.gov: Travel Advisories

    Exercise increased caution in Bolivia due to civil unrest. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

    There are recurring demonstrations, strikes, roadblocks, and marches in major cities in Bolivia.  Demonstrations and marches are centered on city plazas, vote counting centers, and electoral tribunals.  Roadblocks and strikes cut off traffic on major thoroughfares, highways between cities, and airport access.  There are reports of sporadic violence, and local authorities have used crowd control measures to discourage protests.

    Domestic and international flights may be delayed or cancelled, and road travel around and between cities may be impeded.

    Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

    If you decide to travel to Bolivia:

    • Limit plans for travel to and around Bolivia.
    • Avoid demonstration areas.
    • Find a safe location, and shelter in place if in the vicinity of large gatherings or protests.
    • Monitor local media for updates on demonstrations and security conditions.
    • Plan for alternate travel routes or remain in place if planned travel is inhibited.
    • Contact your airline or travel agency prior to travel.
    • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
    • Follow the Department of State on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.
    • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Bolivia.
    • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

    Last Update: Reissued with addition of civil unrest indicator.

  • Tue, 22 Oct 2019 00:00:00 +0000: Afghanistan - Level 4: Do Not Travel - travel.state.gov: Travel Advisories

    Do not travel to Afghanistan due to crime, terrorism, civil unrest, kidnapping, and armed conflict

    Travel to all areas of Afghanistan is unsafe because of critical levels of kidnappings, hostage taking, suicide bombings, widespread military combat operations, landmines, and terrorist and insurgent attacks, including attacks using vehicle-borne, magnetic, or other improvised explosive devices (IEDs), suicide vests, and grenades.  

    Terrorist and insurgent groups continue planning and executing attacks in Afghanistan. These attacks occur with little or no warning, and have targeted official Afghan and U.S. government convoys and facilities, local government buildings, foreign embassies, military installations, commercial entities, non-governmental organization (NGO) offices, hospitals, residential compounds, tourist locations, transportation hubs, public gatherings, markets and shopping areas, places of worship, restaurants, hotels, universities, airports, schools, gymnasiums, and other locations frequented by U.S. citizens and other foreign nationals.

    The U.S. Embassy's ability to provide routine and emergency services to U.S. citizens in Afghanistan is severely limited, particularly outside of Kabul. Evacuation options from Afghanistan are extremely limited due to the lack of infrastructure, geographic constraints, and the volatile security situation.

    Family members cannot accompany U.S. government employees who work in Afghanistan. Unofficial travel to Afghanistan by U.S. government employees and their family members is restricted and requires prior approval from the Department of State. U.S. Embassy personnel are restricted from traveling to all locations in Kabul except the U.S. Embassy and other U.S. government facilities unless there is a compelling U.S. government interest in permitting such travel that outweighs the risk. Additional security measures are needed for any U.S. government employee travel and movement through Afghanistan.

    Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Afghanistan, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

    Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

    If you decide to travel to Afghanistan:

    • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
    • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
    • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
    • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs, if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Consider signing a power of attorney.
    • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization, or consider consulting with a professional security organization. Carry a communication device and, where possible, ride in armored vehicles.
    • Notify a trusted person of your travel itinerary and contact information. Avoid discussing your movement plans in public where you can be overheard or with persons who do not have the need to know.
    • Obtain medical evacuation insurance with a company that operates in Afghanistan and obtain a list of clinics and hospitals that may be used as an evacuation point.
    • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
    • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter and  Instagram.
    • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Afghanistan.
    • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

    Last Update: Reissued without changes.

  • Tue, 22 Oct 2019 00:00:00 +0000: Peru - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution - travel.state.gov: Travel Advisories

    Exercise increased caution in Peru due to crime and terrorism. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

    Do not travel to:

    • The Colombian - Peruvian border area in the Loreto Region due to crime.
    • The Valley of the Apurímac, Ene, and Mantaro Rivers (VRAEM), including areas within the Departments of Ayacucho, Cusco, Huancavelica, and Junin, due to crime and terrorism.

    Crime, including petty theft, carjackings, muggings, assaults, and violent crime, is a concern in Peru, and can occur during daylight hours, despite the presence of many witnesses. The risk of crime increases after hours and outside the capital city of Lima where more organized criminal groups have been known to use roadblocks to rob victims.

    U.S. government personnel cannot travel freely throughout Peru for security reasons.

    Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

    If you decide to travel to Peru:

    Colombian - Peruvian border area in the Loreto Region – Level 4: Do Not Travel

    Drug trafficking and other criminal activity, combined with poor infrastructure, limits the capability and effectiveness of Peruvian law enforcement in this area.

    The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens as U.S. government personnel are restricted from traveling within 20 kilometers of the border with Colombia in the Loreto region, except on the Amazon River itself, without permission. This includes travel on the Putumayo River, which forms most of the Peru-Colombia border.

    Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

    Valley of the Apurímac, Ene, and Mantaro Rivers (VRAEM) includes areas within the Departments of Ayacucho, Cusco, Huancavelica, and Junin – Level 4: Do Not Travel

    Remnants of the Shining Path terrorist group are active in the VRAEM. The group may attack with little or no warning, targeting Peruvian government installations and personnel.

    Drug trafficking and other criminal activity, combined with poor infrastructure, limit the capability and effectiveness of Peruvian law enforcement in this area.

    In urban areas, the crime rate has increased. U.S. government personnel are restricted from traveling in the VRAEM except for certain areas during daylight hours. The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens due to these travel restrictions.

    U.S. government officials and their families are permitted to travel within many areas of the Department of Cusco, including the Machu Picchu area, the Sacred Valley, and city of Cusco.

    Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

    Travel Restrictions for U.S. Government Personnel

    U.S. government personnel must request advance permission for any travel to the Peruvian-Columbian border and the VRAEM. Sometimes, they are required to travel in armored vehicles or carry personnel trackers. They cannot not use inter- or intra-city bus transportation or travel by road outside urban areas at night except for:

    • Travel by commercial bus on the Pan American Highway, between the Pan-American Highway and Huaraz, or between the Pan-American Highway, Arequipa, and Cusco.
    • Travel by car on the Pan-American Highway south from Lima to Paracas or north from Lima to Huacho (approximately three hours north and south of Lima).

    In the restricted areas, they are permitted to use only the following routes during daylight hours:

    • Road travel from Ayacucho city to Huanta city, staying within the city limits of Huanta, and from Pisco city (Department of Ica) to Ayacucho city.
    • Train travel from Lima to Huancayo city (Department of Junin) and Huancavelica city.
    • Road travel from Lima to Huancayo city.
    • Road travel from La Merced city to the Satipo provincial boundary.

    Last Update: To remove information regarding the Pan American and Parapan American Games.

  • Mon, 21 Oct 2019 00:00:00 +0000: Spain - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution - travel.state.gov: Travel Advisories

    Exercise increased caution in Spain due to terrorism. Exercise increased caution in Barcelona and Catalonia due to civil unrest.

    Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Spain. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

    Since October 14, large demonstrations have taken place throughout Catalonia following the verdict in the trial of 12 pro-independence Catalan leaders. The largest protests have occurred in Barcelona. Some demonstrations have become violent and have blocked roads and disrupted public transportation across the region. Protesters have set fires, vandalized public and private property and attacked security forces. Dozens of injuries have been reported and arrests have been made.

    Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

    If you decide to travel to Spain:

    • Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and crowded public venues.
    • Follow the instructions of local authorities.
    • Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
    • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
    • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
    • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Spain.
    • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
    • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
    • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.

    Last Update: Reissued after update to risk indicator.

  • Mon, 21 Oct 2019 00:00:00 +0000: Lebanon - Level 3: Reconsider Travel - travel.state.gov: Travel Advisories

    Reconsider travel Lebanon due to crime, terrorism, armed conflict and civil unrest . Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

    Do Not Travel to:

    • the border with Syria due to terrorism and armed conflict
    • the border with Israel due to the potential for armed conflict
    • refugee settlements due to the potential for armed conflict

    U.S. citizens should reconsider or avoid travel to certain areas in Lebanon because of the threats of terrorism, armed clashes, kidnapping, and outbreaks of violence, especially near Lebanon’s borders with Syria and Israel. U.S. citizens living and working in Lebanon should be aware of the risks of remaining in the country and should carefully consider those risks.

    U.S. citizens who choose to travel to Lebanon should be aware that consular officers from the U.S. Embassy are not always able to travel to assist them. The Department of State considers the threat to U.S. government personnel in Beirut sufficiently serious to require them to live and work under strict security restrictions. The internal security policies of the U.S. Embassy may be adjusted at any time and without advance notice.

    Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Lebanon. The potential exists for death or injury in Lebanon because of the attacks and bombings perpetrated by terrorist groups. Terrorists may conduct attacks with little or no warning targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities.

    The Lebanese government cannot guarantee the protection of U.S. citizens against sudden outbreaks of violence. Family, neighborhood, or sectarian disputes can escalate quickly and can lead to gunfire or other violence with no warning. Armed clashes have occurred along the Lebanese borders, in Beirut, and in refugee settlements. The Lebanese Armed Forces have been brought in to quell the violence in these situations.

    Public demonstrations can occur with little warning and could become violent. You should avoid areas of demonstrations and exercise caution in the vicinity of any large gatherings. Protesters have blocked major roads to gain publicity for their causes, including the primary road to the U.S. Embassy, and the primary road between downtown Beirut and Rafiq Hariri International Airport. Access to the airport may be cut off if the security situation deteriorates.

    Kidnapping, whether for ransom, political motives, or family disputes, has occurred in Lebanon. Suspects in kidnappings may have ties to terrorist or criminal organizations.

    Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

    If you decide to travel to Lebanon:

    Border with Syria – Level 4: Do Not Travel

    Since August 2014, deadly terror attacks have occurred in border towns along Lebanon’s border with Syria, as have episodic clashes between the Lebanese Army and Syrian-based violent extremist groups. A 2017 Lebanese Army offensive expelled ISIS militants from territory along Lebanon’s border with Syria. The U.S. Embassy strongly urges U.S. citizens to avoid the Lebanese-Syrian border region. The U.S. Department of State also warns U.S. citizens of the risk of traveling on flights that fly over Syria, which include some flights to Beirut.

    Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

    Border with Israel – Level 4: Do Not Travel

    There have been sporadic rocket attacks from southern Lebanon into Israel in connection with the violence between Israel and Hizballah: the last reported incident was in 2014. The U.S. Embassy urges U.S. citizens to avoid this border area.

    Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

    Refugee Settlements – Level 4: Do Not Travel

    The U.S. Embassy urges U.S. citizens to avoid travel to refugee settlements, where violence has resulted in shootings and explosions.

    Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

    Last Update: Reissued with an update to the Risk Indicators


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