Travel Alerts & Warnings

Your homeland government maintains a listing of travel and safety alerts with information and advice on developing situations that may affect the safety and well-being of travelers and vacationers. We use RSS feeds to attempt to maintain regularly updated information on the security, entry and exit requirements, health conditions, local laws and culture, natural disasters and climate, and how to find help when you are in a specific nation.

No matter where in the world you intend to travel, make sure you check your destination country’s travel advice and advisories page twice: once when you are planning your trip, and again shortly before you leave. If the region or the country you will be visiting becomes subject to a travel advisory, your travel health insurance or your trip cancellation insurance may be affected. You are solely responsible for your travel decisions.

▣ The following travel alerts and warnings have been issued to alert travelers of potential risks in certain countries and regions.

  • Thu, 30 Jun 2022 16:09:19 +0000: Saudi Arabia - Travel Advice Summary

    Update to information on Hajj ('Pilgrimage' page)

  • Thu, 30 Jun 2022 15:49:16 +0000: Macao - Travel Advice Summary

    Updated information on changes to entry requirements for Macao ('Entry requirements' page)

  • Thu, 30 Jun 2022 15:31:29 +0000: Sri Lanka - Travel Advice Summary

    Update to information on the economic crisis, shortages of basic necessities and civil unrest ('Summary' and 'Safety and security' pages)

  • Thu, 30 Jun 2022 15:15:53 +0000: Ecuador - Travel Advice Summary

    Addition of information on a 30-day state of emergency for the provinces of Azuay, Imbabura, Sucumbios and Orellana, declared on 29 June ('Summary' page)

  • Thu, 30 Jun 2022 15:07:49 +0000: Vanuatu - Travel Advice Summary

    Updated information on the border re-opening, resumption of scheduled flights and the easing of COVID-19 entry restrictions ('Coronavirus' and ‘Entry requirements’ pages)

Airport Safety

▣ The following travel alerts and warnings have been issued to alert travelers of potential risks in certain countries and regions.

  • Wed, 29 Jun 2022 00:00:00 +0000: Peru - Level 3: Reconsider Travel - travel.state.gov: Travel Advisories

    Last Update: Reissued with updates to crime information.

    Reconsider travel due to crime. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

    Do not travel to:

    • The Colombian-Peruvian border area in the Loreto Region due to crime.
    • The Valley of the Apurímac, Ene, and Mantaro Rivers (VRAEM), including areas within the Departments of Ayacucho, Cusco, Huancavelica, and Junin, due to crime and terrorism.

    Country Summary: Crime, including petty theft, carjackings, muggings, assaults, and other violent crime, is common in Peru and can occur during daylight hours despite the presence of many witnesses.  The risk of crime increases at night.  Organized criminal groups have been known to use roadblocks to rob victims in areas outside of the capital city of Lima.

    U.S. travelers participating in Ayahuasca and Kambo ceremonies should be aware that numerous persons, including U.S. citizens, have reported that while under the influence of these substances, they have witnessed or been victims of sexual assault, rape, theft, serious health problems and injuries, and even death.

    U.S. government personnel cannot travel freely throughout Peru for security reasons.

    Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Peru. 

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Peru has a moderate level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

    If you decide to travel to Peru:

    Colombian-Peruvian border area in the Loreto Region – Level 4: Do Not Travel

    Drug trafficking and other criminal activity, combined with poor infrastructure, limits the capability and effectiveness of Peruvian law enforcement in this area.

    The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens as U.S. government personnel are restricted from traveling within 20 kilometers of the border with Colombia in the Loreto region, except on the Amazon River itself, without permission. This includes travel on the Putumayo River, which forms most of the Peru-Colombia border.

    U.S. government personnel must receive advance permission for any travel to the Peruvian-Colombian border.

    Valley of the Apurímac, Ene, and Mantaro Rivers (VRAEM) includes areas within the Departments of Ayacucho, Cusco, Huancavelica, and Junin – Level 4: Do Not Travel

    Remnants of the Shining Path terrorist group are active in the VRAEM.  The group may attack with little or no warning, targeting Peruvian government installations and personnel.

    Drug trafficking and other criminal activity, combined with poor infrastructure, limit the capability and effectiveness of Peruvian law enforcement in this area.

    U.S. government personnel are restricted from traveling in the VRAEM except for certain areas during daylight hours.  U.S. government personnel must receive advance permission for any travel to the VRAEM. The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens due to these travel restrictions.

    U.S. government officials and their families are permitted to travel within many areas of the Department of Cusco, including the Machu Picchu area, the Sacred Valley, and city of Cusco.

    U.S. government personnel cannot use inter- or intra-city bus transportation or travel by road outside urban areas at night except for:

    • Travel by commercial bus on the Pan American Highway, between the Pan-American Highway and Huaraz, or between the Pan-American Highway, Arequipa, and Cusco.
    • Travel by car on the Pan-American Highway south from Lima to Paracas or north from Lima to Huacho (approximately three hours north and south of Lima).

    In the restricted areas, U.S. government personnel are permitted to use only the following routes during daylight hours:

    • Road travel from Ayacucho city to Huanta city, staying within the city limits of Huanta, and from Pisco city (Department of Ica) to Ayacucho city.
    • Train travel from Lima to Huancayo city (Department of Junin) and Huancavelica city.
    • Road travel from Lima to Huancayo city. 
    • Road travel from La Merced city to the Satipo provincial boundary.

    Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

  • Mon, 27 Jun 2022 00:00:00 +0000: Dominican Republic - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution - travel.state.gov: Travel Advisories

    Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

    Exercise increased caution in the Dominican Republic due to crime.

    Country Summary:  Violent crime, including armed robbery, homicide and sexual assault is a concern throughout the Dominican Republic. The development of a professional tourist police corps, institution of a 911 system in many parts of the country, and a concentration of resources in resort areas means these tend to be better policed than urban areas like Santo Domingo. The wide availability of weapons, the use and trade of illicit drugs, and a weak criminal justice system contribute to the high level of criminality on the broader scale.

    Read the country information page for additional information on travel to the Dominican Republic.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined the Dominican Republic has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

    If you decide to travel to the Dominican Republic:

  • Mon, 27 Jun 2022 00:00:00 +0000: Kuwait - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions - travel.state.gov: Travel Advisories

    Last Update:  Reissued with updates to health information.

    Exercise normal precautions in Kuwait.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

    Do not travel to:

    • The desert region near the border with Iraq due to the prevalence of unexploded ordnance.

    Exercise increased caution in:

    • The Jeleeb Al-Shuyoukh area in Kuwait City due to crime.

    Due to risks to civil aviation operating within the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman region, including Kuwait, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an advisory Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

    Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Kuwait.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Kuwait has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

    If you decide to travel to Kuwait:

    Desert Region North of the Mutla’a Ridge and Near the Border with Iraq – Level 4: Do Not Travel

    Desert areas and certain beaches north of the Mutla’a Ridge continue to contain unexploded ordnance left over from the 1990-1991 Gulf War. Travelers should avoid areas that are “off the beaten path” and avoid touching objects that are potentially unexploded ordnance.

    Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

    Jeleeb Al-Shuyoukh – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

    The Kuwaiti Ministry of Interior has identified the neighborhood of Jeleeb Al-Shuyoukh on the outskirts of Kuwait International Airport as a high-crime area.

    Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

  • Mon, 27 Jun 2022 00:00:00 +0000: Russia - Level 4: Do Not Travel - travel.state.gov: Travel Advisories

    Click Here for Important Information for U.S. Citizens Seeking to Depart Russia

    Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information and updates to U.S. government employee restrictions

    Do not travel to Russia due to the unprovoked and unjustified invasion of Ukraine by Russian military forces, the potential for harassment against U.S. citizens by Russian government security officials, the singling out of U.S. citizens in Russia by Russian government security officials including for detention, the arbitrary enforcement of local law, limited flights into and out of Russia, the Embassy’s limited ability to assist U.S. citizens in Russia, COVID-19-related restrictions, and terrorism. U.S. citizens residing or travelling in Russia should depart Russia immediately.

     

    U.S. citizens should note that U.S. credit and debit cards no longer work in Russia, and options to electronically transfer funds from the United States are extremely limited as a result of sanctions imposed on Russian banks. There are reports of cash shortages within Russia.

    Limited commercial flight options and overland routes by car and bus are still open and available. If you wish to depart Russia, you should make arrangements on your own as soon as possible. The U.S. Embassy has severe limitations on its ability to assist U.S. citizens, and conditions, including transportation options, may suddenly become even more limited. U.S. citizens who are able to depart Russia for another country and are in need of emergency assistance upon arrival may contact a U.S. embassy or consulate in that country.

    Due to Russia’s further invasion of Ukraine, an increasing number of airlines are cancelling flights into and out of Russia, and numerous countries have closed their airspace to Russian airlines. In addition, airspace around southern Russia is restricted, and a number of airports in the area have closed. U.S. citizens located in, or considering travel to, the districts of the Russian Federation immediately bordering Ukraine should be aware that the situation along the border is dangerous and unpredictable. Given the ongoing armed conflict, U.S. citizens are strongly advised against traveling by land from Russia to Ukraine. In addition, there is the potential throughout Russia of harassment of foreigners, including through regulations targeted specifically against foreigners.

    The U.S. government’s ability to provide routine or emergency services to U.S. citizens in Russia is severely limited, particularly in areas far from the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, due to Russian government limitations on travel, the number of U.S. staff, and the ongoing suspension of operations, including consular services, at U.S. consulates.

    Do Not Travel to:

    • The North Caucasus, including Chechnya and Mount Elbrus, due to terrorism, kidnapping, and risk of civil unrest.
    • Crimea due to Russia’s occupation of the Ukrainian territory and abuses by its occupying authorities.

    Country Summary: U.S. citizens, including former and current U.S. government and military personnel and private citizens engaged in business, who are visiting or residing in Russia have been interrogated without cause and threatened by Russian officials, and may become victims of harassment, mistreatment, and extortion. All U.S. government personnel should carefully consider their need to travel to Russia.

    Russian security services have arrested U.S. citizens on spurious charges, singled out U.S. citizens in Russia for detention and/or harassment, denied them fair and transparent treatment, and have convicted them in secret trials and/or without presenting credible evidence. Russian officials may unreasonably delay U.S. consular assistance to detained U.S. citizens. Russian authorities arbitrarily enforce local laws against U.S. citizen religious workers and open questionable criminal investigations against U.S. citizens engaged in religious activity. Russian security services are increasing the arbitrary enforcement of local laws to target foreign and international organizations they consider “undesirable,” and U.S. citizens should avoid travel to Russia to perform work for or volunteer with non-governmental organizations. Russian authorities may not notify the U.S. Embassy of the detention of a U.S. citizen, and consular access to detainees may be denied or severely delayed.

    Russia enforces special restrictions on dual U.S.-Russian nationals and may refuse to acknowledge dual nationals’ U.S. citizenship, including denying access to U.S. consular assistance and preventing their departure from Russia.

    The rights to peaceful assembly and freedom of expression are not guaranteed in Russia, and U.S. citizens should avoid all political or social protests.

    Terrorist groups, transnational and local terrorist organizations, and individuals inspired by extremist ideology continue plotting possible attacks in Russia. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Air Missions (NOTAM) prohibiting U.S. aviation operations into, out of, within, or over those areas of the Moscow Flight Information Region (FIR), the Samara FIR (UWWW) and the Rostov-na-Donu (URRV) FIR within 160NM of the boundaries of the Dnipro (UKDV) Flight Information Regions. For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions, and Notices.

    Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Russia.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Russia has a moderate level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Russia.

    If you decide to travel to Russia:

     

    North Caucasus (including Chechnya and Mount Elbrus) – Level 4: Do Not Travel

    Terrorist attacks and risk of civil unrest continue throughout the North Caucasus region, including in Chechnya, North Ossetia, Ingushetia, Dagestan, Stavropol, Karachayevo-Cherkessiya, and Kabardino-Balkariya. Local gangs have kidnapped U.S. citizens and other foreigners for ransom. There have been credible reports of arrest, torture, and extrajudicial killing of LGBTQI+ persons in Chechnya allegedly conducted by Chechen regional authorities.

    Do not attempt to climb Mount Elbrus, as travelers must pass close to volatile and insecure areas of the North Caucasus region. The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens traveling in the North Caucasus region, including Mount Elbrus, as U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling to the region.

    Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

     

    Crimea – Level 4: Do Not Travel

    The international community, including the United States and Ukraine, does not recognize Russia’s purported annexation of Crimea. There is extensive Russian Federation military presence in Crimea. Russia staged its further invasion of Ukraine, in part, from occupied Crimea, and Russia is likely to take further military actions in Crimea as part of its occupation of this part of Ukraine. There are continuing abuses against foreigners and the local population by the occupation authorities in Crimea, particularly against those who are seen as challenging their authority on the peninsula.

    The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens traveling in Crimea, as U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling to Crimea.

    Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

  • Mon, 27 Jun 2022 00:00:00 +0000: Iraq - Level 4: Do Not Travel - travel.state.gov: Travel Advisories

    Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

    Do not travel to Iraq due to terrorism, kidnapping, armed conflict, civil unrest, and Mission Iraq’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens.

    Country Summary: U.S. citizens in Iraq are at high risk for violence and kidnapping. Terrorist and insurgent groups regularly attack both Iraqi security forces and civilians. Anti-U.S. sectarian militias threaten U.S. citizens and Western companies throughout Iraq. Attacks using improvised explosive devices (IEDs) occur in many areas of the country, including Baghdad.

    Demonstrations, protests, and strikes occur frequently. These events can develop quickly without prior notification, often interrupting traffic, transportation, and other services; such events have the potential to turn violent.

    Public consular services at the Embassy remain suspended until further notice as a result of terrorist attacks on the Embassy compound on December 31, 2019. U.S. Consulate General Erbil remains open for routine American Citizens Services but is only able to provide limited appointments for nonimmigrant visa interviews.

    On March 25, 2020, the Department of State ordered the departure of designated U.S. government employees from the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad and the Baghdad Diplomatic Support Center due to security conditions and restricted travel options as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to security concerns, U.S. Embassy personnel in Baghdad are instructed to not use Baghdad International Airport.

    U.S. citizens should not travel through Iraq to Syria to engage in armed conflict, where they would face extreme personal risks (kidnapping, injury, or death) and legal risks (arrest, fines, and expulsion). The Kurdistan Regional Government stated that it will impose prison sentences of up to ten years on individuals who illegally cross the border. Additionally, fighting on behalf of, or supporting designated terrorist organizations, is a crime that can result in penalties, including prison time and large fines in the United States.

    Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Iraq, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

    Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Iraq.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Iraq has a moderate level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

    If you decide to travel to Iraq:

    • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the U.S. Embassy's web page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
    • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
    • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
    • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
    • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs if you are unable to return as planned to the United States.
    • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
    • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
    • Follow the Department of State on Facebook  and Twitter.
    • Review the Country Security Report for Iraq.
    • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.